Here's what we're drinking, and you should too.

Last night I had the pleasure of meeting Brad Estabrooke, owner and founder of the Breuckelen Distilling Company.  Breuckelen is one of three distilleries that opened in Brooklyn this year, and while their focus is on production of a mid-range gin, Breuckelen is also beginning to experiment with whiskies.
At a tasting event held at Ward III, Estabrooke unveiled three experimental whiskies he’s playing with: a wheat whiskey aged 1 day in charred oak, a corn whiskey aged 9 days, and a rye aged for 57 days.
The wheat whiskey was sweet, a touch herbaceous, and a little spicy on the end.  Really great stuff, and startlingly brown for only one day in the cask (Brad also expressed surprise at how much the wood affected the spirit in so short a time).  The corn whiskey was very smooth and neutral, almost non-distinctive.  The rye was more complex and went over quite well with fellow tasters.
Thanks to Brad for letting us taste and provide feedback on this early-stage product.  I’m really looking forward to seeing how these develop - particularly the wheat whiskey.  You’ll be reading more about Estabrooke and Breuckelen Distilling here in the future.  In the meantime, you can read all about how he got started, and watch him make a batch of gin, at this Huffington Post story.

Last night I had the pleasure of meeting Brad Estabrooke, owner and founder of the Breuckelen Distilling Company.  Breuckelen is one of three distilleries that opened in Brooklyn this year, and while their focus is on production of a mid-range gin, Breuckelen is also beginning to experiment with whiskies.

At a tasting event held at Ward III, Estabrooke unveiled three experimental whiskies he’s playing with: a wheat whiskey aged 1 day in charred oak, a corn whiskey aged 9 days, and a rye aged for 57 days.

The wheat whiskey was sweet, a touch herbaceous, and a little spicy on the end.  Really great stuff, and startlingly brown for only one day in the cask (Brad also expressed surprise at how much the wood affected the spirit in so short a time).  The corn whiskey was very smooth and neutral, almost non-distinctive.  The rye was more complex and went over quite well with fellow tasters.

Thanks to Brad for letting us taste and provide feedback on this early-stage product.  I’m really looking forward to seeing how these develop - particularly the wheat whiskey.  You’ll be reading more about Estabrooke and Breuckelen Distilling here in the future.  In the meantime, you can read all about how he got started, and watch him make a batch of gin, at this Huffington Post story.

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